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Illegal Marijuana Grows In Michigan Now Only A Misdemeanor Crime

A recent court ruling in Michigan regarding illegal marijuana grows has sparked a lot of attention and debate. In essence, the state’s Court of Appeals ruled that growing illegal marijuana, even in large quantities, is only considered a misdemeanor offense under the 2018 Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act.

This ruling holds great importance for both individuals involved in the marijuana industry and the state of Michigan as a whole. It not only changes the legal consequences for those caught growing illegal marijuana, but also reflects a changing perspective on cannabis and its use in society.

To fully understand the significance of this recent court ruling reported first by MLive, it is important to first look at the history and background of marijuana laws in Michigan. For over four decades, the state’s 1978 drug law imposed harsh penalties for illegal marijuana grows, including up to 15 years in prison for possessing more than a certain amount of plants.

This law had significant impacts on individuals and communities, especially those from marginalized backgrounds. However, in 2018, Michigan voters passed the Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act, which aimed to decriminalize marijuana use and possession for adults over 21 years old.

This brought about major changes in the state’s approach towards marijuana and set the stage for the recent court ruling on illegal marijuana grows.

Details of the Court Ruling

The recent ruling by the Michigan Court of Appeals declared that growing illegal marijuana, even in large quantities, is only considered a misdemeanor offense. This means that individuals caught growing marijuana without a license will now face much lesser consequences, with the maximum penalty being up to 93 days in jail.

However, this ruling also has implications for past and current convictions related to illegal marijuana grows. Cases that were previously charged as felonies after 2018 may now be reevaluated and potentially reduced to misdemeanors. This not only brings relief to individuals who were previously facing harsh punishments, but it also helps alleviate overcrowding in prisons and the burden on the criminal justice system.

Comparing the penalties under the old law versus the new law, it is clear that there has been a significant shift in the state’s approach towards marijuana. This ruling reflects a more progressive and understanding perspective, recognizing that growing marijuana does not pose as much of a threat to society as once perceived.

However, it is important to note that while the court ruling may have reduced the penalties for growing illegal marijuana, individuals involved in this activity could still face serious consequences for other crimes. This includes tax evasion and potential seizure of their plants.

“There was never any need for there to be a military invasion, felony or any long sentences or anything like that, so that worked out,” marijuana activist Jamie Lowell told MLive, he helped write the law that reduced penalties. “There are limits and there are parameters and if someone gets outside of them there are consequences, but it’s just cannabis.”

Since passage of the the act in 2018, more than 3,500 people have been charged and 1,072 convicted under the outdated 1978 law, according to analysis provided to MLive by Michigan Supreme Court spokesman John Nevin.

In past years, we have seen various states take extreme measures to crack down on illegal marijuana grows, often targeting small-scale growers and disproportionately affecting marginalized communities. States like California, and Oklahoma have been known for conducting aggressive raids and imposing harsh penalties on those caught growing marijuana without a license.

In fact, in 2011, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and local law enforcement conducted a massive crackdown on illegal marijuana grows in Northern California known as “Operation Full Court Press.” This operation involved hundreds of arrests and the deployment of military-style tactics, including helicopters and armed agents. The impact of this operation was felt throughout the region, with many families and small businesses being affected.

Similarly, in Oklahoma, the state legalized medical marijuana in 2018 and quickly approved thousands of licenses for growers resulting in millions of dollars in licensing fees for the state. However, with the passing of HB 2095 they soon launched a crackdown on those who were not in full compliance with their strict regulations. This resulted in numerous arrests and raids on small-scale cannabis growers.

Impact of the Ruling

The recent court ruling in Michigan marks a major step toward a more progressive and fair approach toward marijuana. For individuals, this means that they will no longer face unnecessarily harsh punishments for possessing or growing marijuana without a license. It also brings hope for those with past convictions related to illegal marijuana grows.

Furthermore, this ruling sets an example for other states to follow in terms of their laws and penalties surrounding marijuana. While some states have already legalized marijuana use and possession, many still have strict laws that disproportionately affect marginalized communities. By reducing the penalties for illegal marijuana grows, Michigan is paving the way for a more balanced and just approach towards cannabis.

Overall, the recent court ruling in Michigan regarding illegal marijuana grows is a significant step towards a more progressive and understanding perspective on cannabis. It not only changes the legal consequences for those caught growing it illegally but also highlights the need for other states to reevaluate their laws and penalties surrounding marijuana.

This ruling should serve as a reminder that the criminalization of marijuana has had detrimental effects on individuals and communities, and it is time for a more compassionate and fair approach toward this plant. So let’s applaud Michigan’s move in the right direction and encourage other states to follow suit.


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